Rate my new filter/dewater rig

Collecting, filtering and dewatering of WVO SVO vegetable oil. For Biodiesel producers too.

Moderators: SunWizard, coachgeo

Postby canolafunola » Sat Mar 15, 2008 9:29 pm

Upflow filtering system is cheap to run and effective. It takes longer than just in time filtering. If you must have that, I'd suggest a centrifuge.
93 Gulfstream RV w Cummins 5.9 diesel pusher
canolafunola
 
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2008 9:27 am

Postby hheynow » Sat Mar 15, 2008 10:15 pm

If your store/settle container is a 55 gal steel drum you could add a band heater and heat to 150*F then let cool very slowly. Since you have a standpipe in there this is the design I use to de-water my oil. After it has cooled I open the bottom valve and drain until clear then I hot pan test the standpipe drain valve oil. I never rely on water blocking filters.
FOR SALE: 1997 Ford F-350 7.3L PSD - Plant Drive kit
1984 Mercedes Euro 300D NA - Custom two tank
Running on used plant oil and biodiesel since May 2006
hheynow
 
Posts: 147
Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2008 9:10 pm
Location: California

Postby jordanmills » Sat Mar 15, 2008 10:18 pm

What if the oil goes in at 140-150 F and just sits to settle?
2001 F-250 (7.3 L PSD)
2-tank custom/self-built SVO system
jordanmills
 
Posts: 95
Joined: Fri Mar 07, 2008 1:14 pm
Location: Pearland, TX (near Houston)

Postby hheynow » Sat Mar 15, 2008 10:47 pm

If your store/settle container is well insulated (aluminum bubble wrap) it will cool very slowly. That's when the water drops out. Mine drops to ambient in about 36 hours. If it REALLY is at 150*F once transferred it will de-water. Remember that during heating there are rising convective currents which prevent proper settling and de-watering. That's why a very slow cooling is the key.
FOR SALE: 1997 Ford F-350 7.3L PSD - Plant Drive kit
1984 Mercedes Euro 300D NA - Custom two tank
Running on used plant oil and biodiesel since May 2006
hheynow
 
Posts: 147
Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2008 9:10 pm
Location: California

Postby David » Sun Mar 16, 2008 2:49 am

I really think this heated settling dewatering is all too complicated and hit and miss. My pump driven recirculating evaporative dryer will do 150L ( 40 Gal) in 3 hours to perfect, NO bubbles hot pan test standard.

I dried 450L of oil yesterday and spent less than 90 min of my time doing it. That was mainly manually loading and unloading the oil because I am in the middle of putting together a new setup and haven't been able to get all the fittings I need. I reckon I will be able to do the same amount of oil when I can pump it in and out in around 30 min all up including the hot pans tests.

Once the dryer is loaded, all I have to do is switch it on and go find something to do for 3 hours. I come back, run a hot, hot pan test and then fill my drums. I have got used to the setup now and the last batch I did yesterday appeared wetter than usual by the colour of the oil when I initially started the dryer going. I tested at the 3 Hr mark and sure enough the oil was close, but not to the no bubbles at all standard I like to work to. Another hour and it was fine and because I was in the middle of a TV show, It got another 30 min for good measure.

Today while mucking around I came up with a brainwave and changed the way the oil is squirted into the oil pool which I think will increase the efficiency of the thing.

A friend dropped around yesterday and commented on the energy usage in comparison to a bubble drying setup which he is having trouble getting to work in any reasonable time frame.
At my electrical rates of .13C/ KWh, with my pump running for a normal 3 hour run, it is costing me all of 0.14 C/L (0.54C/ Gal) to reliably and quickly dry my oil to a high standard. Weather seems to effect the process very little be it temperature or humidity and this seem a far better system to me than all the time, complication and uncertainty of heated settling.
David
 
Posts: 333
Joined: Thu Mar 06, 2008 4:12 am
Location: Sydney Australia

Postby hheynow » Sun Mar 16, 2008 1:30 pm

David that's a great method. Never though of an evaporative dryer. Any links or plans?
FOR SALE: 1997 Ford F-350 7.3L PSD - Plant Drive kit
1984 Mercedes Euro 300D NA - Custom two tank
Running on used plant oil and biodiesel since May 2006
hheynow
 
Posts: 147
Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2008 9:10 pm
Location: California

Postby Burbarian » Sun Mar 16, 2008 1:55 pm

I'd like to see a quantitative comparison in equipment and processing cost between an evaporative dryer and a centrifuge. I was leaning towards a heated evaporative mist wash until Sun suggested using a centrifuge.

My concern with evaporative is that it does not remove water soluble as well as nonvolatile liquid contaminants. Stuff like sugar, salt, acids like vinegar, cleaning and degreasing agents, and anything else that fell into the oil which does not boil off and will not be caught by a filter.
Burbarian
 
Posts: 195
Joined: Wed Mar 05, 2008 12:14 pm
Location: Vermont

Postby SunWizard » Sun Mar 16, 2008 2:28 pm

Equipment, evaporative (EV) is about the same operating $ except for the $2-300 more for the CF equipment. EV higher temp but for less time so about the same cost. CF doesn't need a mistwast, EV does since it won't get out the contaminants you list. With EV you could do a mini-mistwash to see if its needed, see my thread here about TDS meters. With EV you still need to buy filters and do another step, not needed for CF. Cost savings on filters would depend on how much VO you process, and how long you settle before filtering, but for me it paid the cost of the CF quickly, <1 year.
YVORMV - Your veg. oil results may vary.
95 Dodge Cummins 4x4 SVO WVO conversion.
81 Mercedes 300D- stock and happy on V80/D20 blend.
Low fossil net zero house- 100% solar power and heat.
SunWizard
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1723
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2006 2:53 pm
Location: N. Colorado

Previous

Return to Vegetable oil Collecting, Filtering and Dewatering

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron