Evacuated solar in cold climates-SunWizard?

Its like a chat room. This is where your post gets moved if you get too far off topic.

Moderators: SunWizard, coachgeo

Evacuated solar in cold climates-SunWizard?

Postby powerstroke73L » Fri Aug 01, 2008 11:04 am

Currently my hot water is heated by electricity. The unit is a new 80 gallon Whirlpool, but electric is electric-not very economical. I am planning on installing a 7 day digital timer to limit the call for heating to fall within certain hours. Both my fiancee and I are gone for 7+ hours a day so no need for hot water during that time. However, in reading about evacuated solar tube collectors I'm intrigued. From what I've read these can be used for water heating in any climate-is that true? I live in New Jersey, so this is obviously important.

If they can be used in cold climates what ancillary equipment do I need to install them? On American Solar Works' website they mention that one panel can heat 200 gallons per day which is much more than we would ever need since we are not using it for space heating. Is it as simple as mounting one panel on the roof and plumbing the water supply for the hot water heater through the panel? Also, I understand how the system works in that the tube enclosed in a vacuum allows the sun's energy to be absorbed on cold sunny days, but what happens to the water when it is 10 degrees below zero at 3 AM when the sun has been down for nearly 12 hours? Are the tubes then in danger of freezing?
powerstroke73L
 
Posts: 64
Joined: Sun May 25, 2008 2:34 am

Re: Evacuated solar in cold climates-SunWizard?

Postby SunWizard » Fri Aug 01, 2008 1:07 pm

powerstroke73L wrote: From what I've read these can be used for water heating in any climate-is that true?

True.
If they can be used in cold climates what ancillary equipment do I need to install them?

They typically are used with antifreeze in them, and a circulating pump and a heat exchanger in your hot water tank. And you need a controller to turn on and off the pump when the sun is shining.

Most use a larger hot water tank than you would with a water heater, so you have excess solar stored for at night and a few cloudy days. I have a 500 gallon tank, that gets to boiling almost every day, summer or winter.
YVORMV - Your veg. oil results may vary.
95 Dodge Cummins 4x4 SVO WVO conversion.
81 Mercedes 300D- stock and happy on V80/D20 blend.
Low fossil net zero house- 100% solar power and heat.
SunWizard
Site Admin
 
Posts: 1723
Joined: Mon Dec 11, 2006 2:53 pm
Location: N. Colorado


Return to Off topic banter

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

cron