Wood Gasification = Holzvergaser

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Wood Gasification = Holzvergaser

Postby BMW Fan » Fri Aug 15, 2008 6:26 pm

SEEKING INVESTORS / BUYERS for GERMAN - BUILT / PATENTED

HOLZVERGASER – WOOD GASIFIER



This technology involves using a century-old technique, developed to meet the

latest standards. Works with wood chips, sawdust, tree leaves and needles, pellets,

rapeseed cake, sewage sludge, etc. to produce electricity.



This unit is capable of 110 KW per hour (electrical power), and approximately

160 KW of thermal power. The combination and use of both sources of power make

this unit very economical to use.



To obtain more information about this interesting opportunity, please contact :

klausold@yahoo.de



* * * * * * * * * *

- FOR THE HOBBYIST -



ANOTHER OFFERING : I also have plans / schematics for the do-it-yourself

developer who wants to build a small unit for use at home. At this stage,

EXPERIMENTAL ONLY.



The aforementioned plans are based on a model which was built and used, circa

1945. The plans include :



an Empiric report with plans and design used to operate this wood-gas plant;

as well, in excess of 100 detailed pages in a binder (hard copy); and a manual for

the wood-gas plant with designs regarding the construction of the unit.



Moreover, the drawing-set covers parts list, diagrams, individual part designs, and

instructions as to the finishing of the metal parts. Also included are some

references and pictures related to the adapting of a petrol engine to wood-gas.

There is a discussion regarding continuous operation (stationary engine), showing

the relevant schematic.



NOTE : I have built and tested these units. With the plans, anyone can build

a functioning wood-gas plant, if familiar with metal-working and welding.

This wood-gas unit will produce approximately 50KW an hour. For plans, please

contact me at the e-mail address above. Plans are $200.00.



WARNING : No warranty is implied, given or promised. Build and explore at

YOUR OWN RISK.


http://www.crawldog.com/klausold/index. ... 7_Specials
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Postby leftcoastjeff » Fri Aug 15, 2008 8:34 pm

Like this? with improvements?

http://www.gengas.nu/byggbes/index.shtml

Got lots of black walnut saw dust, and havent found a gasification reactor
that will handle without pellitizing, other than very large operations

How about a sneak peak?

LCjeff
'87F-250 stock, minus that pesky water seporator/air inlet, bone stock for now.

Thomas Edison says it best, “Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work”.
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Postby BMW Fan » Sat Aug 16, 2008 7:27 am

The industrial type is able to handle saw dust,
the DIY version not. Way to dangerous.

I guess you are not looking for the industrial type.
Needs an input app. 75 KG / hour
The DIY plan offer is not a mall scale version.
but modeled after working plans out of 1945.
Both are not connected in any way.

best
BMW Fan
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Postby coachgeo » Sat Aug 16, 2008 7:35 am

Does Gassification plants like this work with paper garbage etc? As in can it act as an incenerator that produces electricity?
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Postby BMW Fan » Sat Aug 16, 2008 7:54 am

As long as your feeding material contains carbon it would work.
So the answer is yes, paper could be part of the mix for the industrial, commercial, newly developed unit.

As for the DIY unit, the answer is no.

BMW Fan
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Postby coachgeo » Sat Aug 16, 2008 12:25 pm

BMW Fan wrote:As long as your feeding material contains carbon it would work.
So the answer is yes, paper could be part of the mix for the industrial, commercial, newly developed unit.

As for the DIY unit, the answer is no.

BMW Fan
If you Pelletize the waste paper products etc then the DIY one would work?
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Postby BMW Fan » Sat Aug 16, 2008 12:57 pm

No, it would not, just IMHO
If you want to find out if I am wrong.....please go ahead and try :D

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Postby coachgeo » Thu Aug 28, 2008 2:30 pm

is the gas produced a liquid or vapor? How do you use the gas to drive say a generator? orr???
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Postby Burbarian » Thu Aug 28, 2008 3:18 pm

I've been using a hot sand bed gasifier for a while now. Yes, it can take paper, wood chips, sawdust, even dog, cat and goat excrement. However, this is with an air-free pressure-cooker style gasifier. One that uses partial combustion, like the more common FEMA style downdraft design may not work properly or as well with paper. The primary concern with paper is bulk, too-easy combustion and the production of a large volume of fine ashes that would clog the airway and contaminate the output fuel gas.

Those things have an output that is predominantly carbon monoxide, and need dry feedstock. Carbon monoxide is a combustible gas (takes O2 from the atmosphere and burns to produce CO2) and you can run a small gas engine from it once it's been filtered and cooled. The output of a 'wet' hot bed gasifier is also predominantly carbon monoxide, but enriched with more hydrogen. (CO partially reacts with H2O to produce H2). It operates at a higher temperature and pressure, but is more forgiving of feedstock. This is sometimes called an 'indirect' gasifier, as opposed to a 'direct' gasifier which does direct partial combustion the feedstock with air. An indirect gasifier is like a pressure cooker with a flame underneath, and part of the gas generated is routed back down to the flame to perpetuate it. Once it gets to operating temperature, it produces more gas than it needs to self-perpetuate the flame, and you can use this excess gas as fuel. The indirect gasifier produces much less soot than a direct gasifier, so typically a dedicated scrubber is not needed. One neat and easy way to remove fine particulates is to have the pressurized gas enter into the middle of a wide cylinder at a tangent. The gas stream will form a vortex and spiral around the inside of the cylinder. Particulates fall out at the periphery and accumulate at the base of the cylinder, while usable fuel gas is taken off the top center. The circulation around the cylinder also air-cools the gas.
The direct gasifier has advantages in that it is partially self regulating, and is a single-shot process or pretty much so. An indirect gasifier on the other hand needs an additional step halfway through. Once the feedstock has been turned into charcoal, it will stop outgasing. Just before this stage is reached, exhaust from the flame is directed into the chamber under the sand bed. There the CO2 is fractured into CO by the hot charcoal. Some setups deliberately add water vapor in this stage to produce more H2, (by squirting water into the flame) but that is finicky as too much could cool it below critical reaction temperature. The produced CO has greater volume than the entering CO2 and releases more energy on combustion with atmospheric O2 than that lost in the chamber by fracturing of the CO2. This is not perpetual energy, as you are continually burning more C (charcoal).
The switch over from zero air input to exhaust gas input can be achieved with a gas flow sensor which detects the drop in gas production when the feedstock has turned mostly into charcoal.
I forego all that additional complexity and just harvest the charcoal for heating, stove and barbecue grill use.
1987 GMC Suburban 6.2L V8 IDI
1985 Merc 300TD
1968 CAT D4D 3304 dozer
1971 Waldon 4100 loader
1981 IHI 30F excavator
1995 Changfa 195 w/ ST 10kw genset
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Postby BMW Fan » Thu Aug 28, 2008 4:56 pm

Hello Burbarian,

I greatly enjoyed your post and envy the knowledge.
As stated before the Industrial type is able to handle paper but not the small 1945 like beast. I believe >2-3 million cars and trucks were equipped with similar units.

Best regards

Klaus
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Postby coachgeo » Thu Aug 28, 2008 8:09 pm

BMW Fan wrote:... I believe >2-3 million cars and trucks were equipped with similar units. ...
2-3 MILLION? vehicles running of wood gasification for fuel source?

That number seems high.... miss type maybe?

How would you handle acceleration in a vehicle? Is their a gas storage system so you can up the demand for acceleration purposes and during cruise the gas production exceeds the gas use thus refilling the tank?
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Postby Burbarian » Thu Aug 28, 2008 9:49 pm

With a direct partial combustion gasifier, the engine intake provides a vacuum that draws the gas. This increases air flow, and the amount of gas produced is then directly coupled and controlled by the engine inlet vacuum. That makes them easy to control to produce variable fuel gas output on demand (with a slight delay) and hence popular for vehicle use. An indirect gasifier operates from the other end, working under pressure instead of vacuum. The vehicle exhaust is directed to the gasifier inlet, and works somewhat similar to a turbo. As you throttle up you produce more exhaust gas which increases fluidized bed gasification which produces more fuel gas. Indirect gasifiers 'burning' charcoal used in this application can end up becoming something of a partial muffler replacement, where hot exhaust gas is used to help maintain chamber temperature and where part of the exhaust is used to provide source gas. An alternative approach introduces a small amount of water instead of exhaust gas and the water immediately vaporizes and is reacted in the hot bed as it flows through from underneath. H2O gets broken into H2 and CO and slowly consumes the charcoal in the hot sand bed. This is due to the high temperatures involved. Hot charcoal is so energetic it will strip the O from H2O to become CO. The output gas is more energetic, but harder to control. A measure of its efficiency is the very low quantity of ashes. Almost everything but the sand and heavy steel casing is consumed when using charcoal. With other feedstocks, metals, sulphur, silicates, and other impurities make up the remaining ash.

Producer gas is hot and sooty. When cooled, it gets even dirtier as hot volatile organic compounds condense in the storage container. These would be tars, gums, resins and waxes. The stuff builds up exactly like creosote in an insufficiently hot fireplace chimney and will clog these storage solutions as well as clog the inlet and damage improperly modified engines. Burning straight charcoal will bypass this to produce clean dry carbon monoxide and hydrogen. (never thought I'd describe carbon monoxide as clean..) Once the soot is removed and the gas is cooled, it can be compressed readily into a standard large compressed air tank. The gas can be used much like propane through a modified regulator. (larger bore as it has less energy and needs greater flow) However unlike propane, using producer gas in this way is dangerous, as carbon monoxide does not have a smell, and is very toxic. A leaky compressed air tank full of carbon monoxide can poison you without your realizing. As well, it doesn't compress readily into a liquid unlike propane, making storage difficult. Similar with trying to store straight hydrogen. You'd need very high pressures, or dangerous and difficult cryogenic storage. That's why it is called 'producer gas'. It is immediately consumed as it is produced, with negligible storage.
1987 GMC Suburban 6.2L V8 IDI
1985 Merc 300TD
1968 CAT D4D 3304 dozer
1971 Waldon 4100 loader
1981 IHI 30F excavator
1995 Changfa 195 w/ ST 10kw genset
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Postby Burbarian » Sat Sep 06, 2008 9:21 pm

Coach, you may find this of interest:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNFYEHz79WM

It shows distillation of volatile organics from woodgas using a copper coil in water, like a moonshine still. Note however that these distilled condensates are a mix of water, volatile organics like tars, resins, creosote and turpenes. The smoke coming out of the cap is water vapor 'enriched' with hydrogen and carbon monoxide. When using charcoal, there will be much less volatile organics and water, and the gas is true producer gas, which can be used to run a gas engine. Using regular wood, you get a lot of the distillable volatile liquids initially. Once it is all driven out, you get the same stuff as from charcoal.

I've done some experiments with the tar and resins cooked off of abundant pine scrap (cones, branches/twigs and needles). If you dumped the gooey stuff into a pressure cooker with a quart of water and let it cook until it starts whistling, then distilled the output gas, you get a lighter red/amber liquid that is much less thick and is flammable.

The Changfa burned that stuff just fine in a 50/50 blend with D2. At a guess, I'd say the stuff was mostly raw turpentine.
1987 GMC Suburban 6.2L V8 IDI
1985 Merc 300TD
1968 CAT D4D 3304 dozer
1971 Waldon 4100 loader
1981 IHI 30F excavator
1995 Changfa 195 w/ ST 10kw genset
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Postby coachgeo » Sun Sep 07, 2008 4:02 pm

The reason I asked about paper is cause as an owner of a small sport school I get lots of papertowl waste that could be used as feed stock.
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Postby jburke » Thu Mar 19, 2009 6:31 am

2-3 MILLION? vehicles running of wood gasification for fuel source?

remember it was a 1945 design.
fwir, every German military vehicle had one.
the japanese and germans were synthesizing liquid hydro carbons from coal and other sources. soviets probably too.
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