moth balls WITH naphta??

Single Tank WVO systems and blending SVO WVO to thin it.

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moth balls WITH naphta??

Postby 3lr » Wed Dec 03, 2008 4:15 am

In the olden days mothballs were still manufactured WITH naphta...
I have heard ppl sugest that adding naphta increases the cetane value
of diesel and VO, and mothballs were well suited for that.

Are the old style mothballs still availabe ANYWHERE?

ty
john
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Postby 3lr » Wed Dec 03, 2008 11:41 pm

Paraffin wax, even if thined would in not be soild at room temperature?
i have some "100%Paraffin" lampoil and it is about as thin as #1 PD
at roomtemp -- however how much cetane boost would it provide?
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Postby mixelpix » Mon Dec 15, 2008 12:16 am

Hi 3lr,

Well, if you listen to the right people you might end up trying to put medical nitroglycerin pills in your tank along with all sorts of crazy or otherwise ineffectual stuff. Don't try that but do go and watch the movie, "The World's Fastest Indian" if you have not already seen it :-)

A great place to get some alt fueling grounding is the book, "Sliding Home" by Ray Holan. He covers pretty much all your blending options from xylene to tuloene, acetone, pure gum turpentine and plenty others. I think it is maybe $20 with S&H - well worth it!

Naphtha is commonly available as varnish makers and painters (VM&P) naphtha in any hardware store. Could be wrong here, but I think naphthalenes are also what comprise Petroleum ether, but don't quote me on that! Naphtha makes an excellent purging liquid if applied properly to your injectors but i rarely find it cheaply enough to use as a fuel. As a non-fossil fuel additive which has a very high cetane rating, try pure gum turpentine. It is made from the resin of pine trees and also makes a good injector purging liquid.

Please don't go throwing any old hydrocarbon in your tank. If you were awake in chemistry class you might remember that "hydrocarbons" are many. Diamonds are hydrocarbons for example. Am not talking carbon emissions, but as for liquid hydrocarbons, lots and lots of them are toxic in and of themselves. Toxic, like carcinogenic and mutagenic, like benzene which is in gasoline. The emissions created by combusting hydrocarbon blends are often even worse than the individual constituents. But please don't take my word for it, the peer reviewed research has been done and is available through your library. Likely very expensive over the internet (like $30 for 48 hour access)

Something useful which can be said of all hydrocarbon liquids, toxic or not - they are all organic :D

Anyways, I hope this information helps you with your predictions about the liquid hydrocarbon in question, others and any or all of their augmenting and diminishing characteristics as diesel fuel constituents. On that note, I would be especially wary of performing practical experiments on post 2000 DI's which are still under warranty coverage. :D

What are you driving?

Best,
-Patrick
Last edited by mixelpix on Mon Dec 15, 2008 4:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby coachgeo » Mon Dec 15, 2008 12:48 am

mixelpix wrote:...A great place to get some alt fueling grounding is the book, "Sliding Home" by Ray Holan. He covers pretty much all your blending options from xylene to tuloene, acetone, pure gum turpentine and plenty others. I think it is maybe $20 with S&H - well worth it!...
Welcome aboard Patrick.

Talk about jumping in with both feet with some tight information. Newly registered today and your spitting out claims of good reference material. Been around long time and never heard of these, but then again I avoid books in general and mostly read net material.

Mucho thanx! Look forwar do what folk find out about these.

BTW folk.... found a vendor selling these books. Here is what he says about the book-
fryer-to-fuel.com wrote: A revised and expanded 8th edition of his great WVO SVO book. Ray has added several chapters, among them are a chapter on diesels vs. hybrids and a chapter about mixing chemicals with vegetable oil in an attempt to avoid the expense of an SVO conversion on the vehicle. Sliding Home introduces you to the advantages of a diesel vehicle. It shows you how to: select a diesel to fit your needs, add a hybrid fuel system so it can run on recycled vegetable oil, and maintain it for years of trouble-free miles. Get a complete manual written with the beginner in mind. Learn how SVO fueling benefits you. Discover the real differences between SVO, Biodiesel, and Petroleum Diesel. 374 pages with 200 photographs.
Life; It's all in the Balance

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Paraffin & hydrocarbon confusion

Postby John Galt » Mon Dec 15, 2008 1:04 am

Brits call kerosene "Paraffin".

N. Americans refer to Paraffin as the wax byproduct of petroleum refining.

Paraffin wax is typically dissolved into summer diesel fuel to increase it's BTU content.

BTW the movie, "The World's Fastest Indian" is excellent, do see it.

Diamonds are hydrocarbons for example.


NO they're NOT. Diamonds are pure carbon.

Hydrocarbons are compounds that contain hydrogen and carbon.

mixing chemicals with vegetable oil in an attempt to avoid the expense of an SVO conversion


"attempt" sounds pretty biased to me.
Last edited by John Galt on Mon Dec 15, 2008 2:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby mixelpix » Mon Dec 15, 2008 4:16 am

coachgeo wrote:Welcome aboard Patrick.


Thanks, and likewise for the moderation :)

You should try scribD.com, it has full versions of most everything I've previewed on Google.books. Glad to help. I know Kaya, the editor of from the fuel to the fryer. Mostly she was just the authors g/f @ the time, but that's about all i know, :lol:

Another great read is "Not A Gas Station: A History of the BioFuel Oasis and How to Create Your Own Biodiesel Filling Station" By Jennifer Radtke. She and a couple other fabulous ladies have a women's co-op which sells neat ASTM b100 (maybe b99? actually, yeah, i think that's what they sell cause of insurance or city regs, likely she explains in her book, i just skimmed it... but I happily supported my local alt fuelers when I paid cash for it!) from Yokayo Biofuels in Ukiah, CA. They are a great company and I strongly urge (tee-hee) you to pester them with all your questions, they are awesome and really smart and very financially savvy.

As for the ladies book, they also made a ladies of biodiesel calendar one year! Jennifer graciously provides a coherent business model for the resller. The Yokayo B/F'ers (!) own the means of producing biodiesel. Not sure if they bought if through the folks at the Solar Living Center in Hopland, CA but you should check them out too cause they teach and sell everything sustainable short of hydroponics! It's my favorite gas station by far! They even have a nice working little Brown's gas model next to their acre of solar panels... :D

Best,
Patrick "If you can't say anything nice, come sit by me" Kennedy


p.s. :p tho these are not technically "hydrocarbon" diamonds, they are diamonds from hydrocarbons:
http://www.lanl.gov/orgs/tt/license/technologies/index.php?fuseaction=home.viewTechnology&id=553
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