Test Methods for Water in SVO

Collecting, filtering and dewatering of WVO SVO vegetable oil. For Biodiesel producers too.

Moderators: SunWizard, coachgeo

Postby SunWizard » Wed Oct 13, 2010 9:00 am

Now that I have bought and compared most of the water testing methods listed in post#1, ASTM D2709, Sandy Brae, and HPT, the water test I like best is one not listed: capacitive % saturated meter
Its easier and faster than any of them.

John Galt wrote:500ppm is considered the lower limit of the HPT sensitivity.

From comparing HPT with sandy brae, the lower limit depends on FFA level. On my 4.5% FFA sample, 1500 PPM passed the HPT with no bubbles. See this thread for more details: WVO science project, FFA, standards and water testing
YVORMV - Your veg. oil results may vary.
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Postby John Galt » Wed Oct 13, 2010 11:35 am

My favorite is the fast and easy vapor test; how did it compare?
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Postby SunWizard » Wed Oct 13, 2010 1:21 pm

I got bad results with the vapor test, all my calibrated samples including my 1500 ppm sample had no vapor ring. I even tried chilling the piece of glass that I used in the refrig. to 40F and it still showed no vapor. The only times I got a vapor result is with my >5000 ppm samples which is far too much water. And even with those, the results varied widely, probably depending on how hot the glass piece got during the 1 to 2 minutes its microwaving.

I always get well below 0 suspended water, which is 0 bubbles on a HPT, and 0 ring of vapor, and want to know how far below that 100% saturated point I am.

For biodiesel, the Karl Fischer test used is ASTM D6304, which is coulometric and better for WVO as well. Its supposed to be much better than the E203 you mention in post#1, and better for <500 ppm, they even say this on the ASTM page you linked.
YVORMV - Your veg. oil results may vary.
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Postby John Galt » Wed Oct 13, 2010 6:52 pm

That's good to know. So the vapor test isn't any better than the HPT. Looks like I'm going to have to find a source for the FFA test strips and capacitive % saturated meter parts up here in Canukland.
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Postby SunWizard » Thu Oct 14, 2010 9:08 am

John Galt wrote:Looks like I'm going to have to find a source for the FFA test strips and capacitive % saturated meter parts up here in Canukland.

Digikey for the sensor ships to canada, and capacitance meters are common and should be easy to find. Although its hard to get the specs on it to be sure its a 0.5% accuracy model.
YVORMV - Your veg. oil results may vary.
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Postby zoochy » Thu Jul 21, 2011 12:09 pm

John Galt wrote:That's good to know. So the vapor test isn't any better than the HPT. Looks like I'm going to have to find a source for the FFA test strips and capacitive % saturated meter parts up here in Canukland.


@John: Did you manage to find a source for FFA test strips that ship to Canadian addresses? If so, could you please share your source as I have had no luck.
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Postby John Galt » Thu Jul 21, 2011 12:42 pm

no I didn't
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Re: Test Methods for Water in SVO

Postby John Galt » Thu Oct 13, 2011 1:34 am

Of all the water test methods the carbide manometer is the least expensive and most accurate for the cost.
http://make-biodiesel.org/Quality-Testi ... rbide.html

Simple U-Tube manometer: meter stick, 5mm tube, binder clips

Image

Simple U-Tube manometer: 'canning jar' cap for carbide test, 500ppm & 1000 ppm calibration marks
Canning jar cap with screw ring fits a variety of jars for the carbide reaction chamber

Image


Tube mortar for crushing carbide: 3/4 pipe 6", 2 end caps, 3" piece of 1/2" rod, 'tea' sieve, funnel

Image

Finely pulverized carbide gives the best test results. Particles caught by the sieve are returned to the mortar for powdering. Powdered carbide that passes the sieve is stored in an airtight container for tests.



For calibration I found it easy to dry 2 liters of BD, then add 1ml to one liter for 1000ppm, and finally mix 300ml of each to make the 500ppm sample. The 1000ppm tested at 31.0 to 31.4 cm and the 500ppm at 15.4 to 15.8 cm, for a calibration constant of 32ppm/cm.

The manometer tube is attached to the meter stick with 1" binder clips,

masking tape was placed on the meter stick and the calibration levels marked on the tape.

The manometer assembly hangs from a hook and the 500 ppm calibration marks are a convenient go/no-go reference. A short piece of 6mm OD tube is sealed into the jar lid so the manometer is easily connected/disconnected.
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Re: Test Methods for Water in SVO

Postby John Galt » Tue Aug 07, 2012 7:10 pm

Test Methods for Water in UVO

Water in vegetable oil and biodiesel exists in three phases, Dissolved, Emulsified, and Free.
The jar on the left contains 'dry' biodiesel with no dissolved water and is transparent. Image
The jar on the right is the dry BD with 1000 ppm added [both dissolved and emulsified water] and is turbid or cloudy.

Dissolved water is characterized by individual water molecules dispersed throughout the oil. It is similar to humidity in the air - the water is there, but it is too small to see because it is dispersed molecule-by-molecule. Thus VO or BD can hold a significant concentration of dissolved water and still appear clear. Most vegetable oils can hold 200 to 1000 PPM of water (0.02 to 0.10 percent) in the dissolved state depending on the temperature and age of the oil. Used oils can hold three to five times more water in the dissolved state than new oil.

Oil becomes saturated with moisture when the amount of water exceeds the maximum concentration for it to remain dissolved. In this second phase, the water is suspended in the oil in microscopic droplets known as an emulsion. This is like fog on a cool, spring day. In that case, the amount of moisture in the air is greater than the saturation point, and a suspension of small droplets of moisture or fog results. In VO or BD, this “fog” is often referred to as haze and the fuel is called 'cloudy' or 'hazy'. Haze usually indicates moisture above 1500 PPM [0.15%] at 'room' temperature. Therefore VO or BD that appears clear may not necessairly be dry enough for use as motor fuel.

Adding more water to an emulsified mixture will cause a separation of phases to produce a third phase of free water as well as the dissolved and suspended water. This is similar to rain falling when the amount of moisture in the air exceeds the dew point. This free water is usually found on the bottom of containers of used VO, where it's mixed in with the fatty sludge and food particles. If free water is evident then it's likely that dissolved and suspended water is also present in the VO or BD.

When testing VO feedstock for making BD, 1000 PPM is usually sufficient and up to 3000 PPM will work, however soap contamination in the finished BD can present a problem with increased water contamination of the feedstock.

The generally acceptable amount of water in VO or BD fuel is 500 PPM or 0.05 percent.

Tests for Water in Vegetable Oil or Biodiesel:
http://make-biodiesel.org/Quality-Testi ... in-vo.html
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