who is using what?

Single Tank WVO systems and blending SVO WVO to thin it.

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who is using what?

Postby sacveggieguy » Thu Mar 13, 2008 10:33 pm

Im going to be single tanking soon and I think I will start by blending50/50 mix of wvo and diesel. I also plan on using a HIH setup with alum fuel line inside coolant hose and a heated coolant filter. To be safe i will be using inj line heaters 4 start up then switching them off when coolant temps are warm. What do you think? What are you guys doing ?

Thanks Paul aka Sacveggieguy
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Postby SunWizard » Fri Mar 14, 2008 8:29 am

Listing what vehicle and location (climate) you have is helpful. In my mercedes I run V80/D10/K10, with no changes to the car, for the past year. But that engine is the best design there is for single tank. And the car was really cheap and old so I don't mind a little experimenting. In cold <40F I switch to V50.
YVORMV - Your veg. oil results may vary.
95 Dodge Cummins 4x4 SVO WVO conversion.
81 Mercedes 300D- stock and happy on V80/D20 blend.
Low fossil net zero house- 100% solar power and heat.
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single tanking

Postby sacveggieguy » Fri Mar 14, 2008 10:59 am

Sorry SunWizard.

Again you make perfect sense. Im running a 1982 300D in northern california.

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Postby 240Volvo » Fri Mar 14, 2008 12:11 pm

Hey, Paul

No FPHE? Klaus has an awesome one now. Electric band on the fuel filter is important for colder weather starts, in case of any gelling in the filter itself. Also a block heater helps a lot on cold mornings.

What about your injectors and glow plugs? Compression OK in all cylinders?

Assuming that the engine, injectors, and glow plugs are OK, there is no need to run such a high amount of diesel if you get heat where it is needed and your outdoor temps are reasonably above freezing. I never run that much, and I think that it gets colder here than there. I will add maybe a 1/4 tank (3-4 gallons) of diesel to my 20 kero/80 WVO blend if there is a severe cold patch < 30F high temps. That would be something like 25% diesel, 12% kero, and 63% WVO.
1984 Volvo 240 diesel with a single tank Elsbett conversion: electric fuel filter heater, FPHE, glow plugs, and injectors. Also injector line heaters and block heater, running 20%kero/80%WVO winter blend.
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do I need it

Postby sacveggieguy » Fri Mar 14, 2008 1:22 pm

Do i need that much heat blending and living in California never see freezing here maybe a light frost.

Thanks Paul aka Sacveggieguy
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Postby 240Volvo » Fri Mar 14, 2008 1:42 pm

A coolant heated fuel filter will not heat your fuel at start up, nor is it an adequate way to bring the oil up to the correct temperature for combustion. If you don't want to modify your car, you will have to blend at a much higher level of petrodiesel than if you apply more heat. The FPHE is by far the most effective way to heat the oil, and ILHs and a fuel filter electric heater will help at start up. But they won't bring your fuel up to temp for full combustion of high % WVO.

Even if the ambient temperature is 100F, your oil will not be 160-180F without modification.

And, you must change your lube oil more frequently, preferably with a fully synthetic or vegetable based lube oil.
1984 Volvo 240 diesel with a single tank Elsbett conversion: electric fuel filter heater, FPHE, glow plugs, and injectors. Also injector line heaters and block heater, running 20%kero/80%WVO winter blend.
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Postby David » Fri Mar 14, 2008 6:56 pm

I did a lot of experimenting with different blends and found they could be an almost constantly variable ratio according to the weather at the time.

In the coldest winter months I was 50 wvo/45 Bio/5 ulp and in summer I was 5% ULP, both with good starting and running. As the weather changes, you can use less blending agent as the weather and more as it gets cooler. I base my ratios on how well the vehicle starts and I worry about it firing on the first turn of the engine.
I also tested Kero, Jet-a1 (same only fairly different) turps and paint thinners in many different ratios. When you get them right, they all pretty much work the same.

A big "advertised" advantage of blending is no mods to the vehicle. I installed a FPHE and found it to be very advantageous. Cheap to buy, simple and quick to install and a very noticable and positive effect on the way the engine ran, even well before it was fully warmed up.
No, it doesn't heat the fuel at startup but if you can get it to start you just have to accept that for a few minutes the engine may not be running under ideal circumstances and be satisfied with that :0).

When it boils down to it, we are drilled that cold oil into a cold engine is the kiss of death but has anyone ever seen any proof of this on a vehicle engine that is driven regularly? I think a whole load of different things are going on in a vehicle engine than some stationary engine run in a university test under unknown parameters 20 years ago. It is probably wise to take a safe approach till there is creditable evidence one way or the other but we shouldn't get too paranoid either.

When I first got into veg and blending and was brainwashed and scared into believing the Coking fear mongering, I installed a very simple water injection system to eliminate any buildup in the engine and remove the fallout any of the less than perfect practices like starting on unheated blends may cause.

That was probably about the best 20 Bux I could have ever spent on that car and I have done soooo many things that are supposed to bring death to an engine for so long and the only thing I find is the car has greatly improved in its performance in the 15 Months I have had it.

While there are people that champion the benefit of injection line heaters and I have never tested them myself, to me the physics just don't make sense. There is simple not enough power being used to have any significant effect on the heating of the amount of metal the lines comprise and then putting any heated oil back through stone cold injectors lodged in the cold head. Still if people believe they work for them, that's all that matters.

Unleaded is a far more effective blending agent than diesel because it has a far greater ability to reduce the viscosity of WVO than diesel. It has limitations though where Kerosene is also very effective and can be used in much higher ratios if needed in extreme circumstances.
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